Inseto

Month: May 2020

Fatigue Testing

29th May 2020

What is Fatigue Testing in materials test? (IKB-029)

Fatigue Testing: A paper clip bent back and forth appears to weaken with each cycle. We call this process fatigue, from the French fatigué, meaning to tire. This is a low cycle fatigue test. As the wire is thin it is easy to apply relatively large strains and the clip breaks in just a few tens of cycles. If you repeat the experiment, bending the clip by smaller amounts, the number of cycles to failure increases.

Fatigue is form of sub-critical crack growth and provides a mechanism for growing a crack until it is long enough for the applied load to cause catastrophic failure. A small latent crack in a circuit board can propagate as the board expands and shrinks with change in temperature until it eventually breaks a track and the board ceases to function. Fatigue failure in un-cracked materials is generally attributed to the initiation and subsequent growth of a crack under cyclic load or strain. Smooth samples can form surface cracks due to the irreversible nature of plasticity. For some materials, such as mild steel, there appears to be a lower limit of stress (endurance or fatigue limit), below which a crack will not form no matter how many times it is cycled. For other materials, like aluminium, this does not appear to be the case. Standards tend to specify a fatigue strength, which is the stress below which the sample will last more than a large number of cycles, generally taken to be 107 or 108cycles.

More often than not cracks start at material defects, which act as powerful stress concentrators and with each fatigue test cycle the crack gets longer until the material eventually fails.

TYPES OF TESTING:

PUSH is designed for bend or compression testing. In this mode a cyclic pushing load is applied to the sample. One of the main applications is to apply cyclic strain to board interconnect through bending. Either 3 or 4-point bending can be used, but it is more usual to use 4-point bending where the high level of surface strain is spread over the entire span of the central rollers.

In Test Parameters the user enters the maximum & minimum compressive loads, the hold time for each and the increasing and decreasing ramp rates.

The cycle repeats until one or more of the End Point Detection parameters are met or the user ends the test. The external input can be used to record board strain or to stop the test when the resistance of a chain of interconnects exceeds a set value. Where multiple gauges need to be recorded, the external input can be used to synchronise the force-displacement data, with a data logger. Resistivity measurement is discussed in IPC/JEDEC 9702 and positioning of strain gauges in IPC/JEDEC 9702 & 9704.

Push Test - 3 Point Flex Bend Fatigue Test
Fatigue Test: Flex Bend

PULL is used for tensile tests, where the load is to be cycled between minimum and maximum tensile loads.
Probably the biggest application for PULL mode is pad cratering. Cyclic loading can be used to propagate small latent cracks until the pad fails during the test or after applying a small static load.

Wire Pull Test Fatigue Test
Fatigue Test: Wire Pull

PUSH-PULL is used to test solder joints, where the joint or component is loaded first one way and then the other. The tool applies the set load first in one direction and then in the opposing direction, repeating this cycle. The displacement is adjusted automatically to get the desired load.

COMPONENT is for cyclic testing of connectors, buttons and keypads. Testing is done under a cyclic displacement with hold periods at the extremes of displacement. Connector failures are generally associated with abrasion of the contact materials and the external input can be used to monitor this.
Stage 1 – The user enters the uppermost position and the length of time in seconds that the tool should remain in this position during the cycle.
Stage 2 – The user enters the rate (insertion rate) at which the tool will move down to the lower position.
Stage 3 – The user enters the lowermost position and the length of time in seconds that the tool should remain in this position during the cycle.
Stage 4 – The user enters the rate (retraction rate) at which the tool moves from the lower to the upper position.
The cycle repeats until one or more of the End Point Detection parameters are met or the user stops the test.

Connector testing is generally about contact wear. Repeated insertion and retraction of connectors wears away coatings and can lead to corrosion of the base metal. The products produced by wear, in general, have a detrimental affect on the insertion force and electrical resistance of the connections. The characteristics of connectors are controlled through the design of the mating parts, the materials used and in some cases, the use of lubricants. Some information on measuring the resistance of contacts is given in ASTM B539 & B794.

Cyclic loading of connectors not only provides useful information for determining the number of times connectors can be plugged and unplugged, but is also a means of testing design changes, such pin shape, spring force and coatings.

Connector Test
Fatigue Test: Connector

Further information:

Material Fatigue Test Method, please click HERE.

Nordson-DAGE bond and materials testing equipment, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Matt Houston

Date

16 November 2017

Version

IKB029 Rev. 1

Download

Heavy Wire Wedge Bonding Cycles

24th May 2020

Heavy Wire Wedge Bonding Cycles: An overview of the different bond head movements on an automated heavy (large) wire bonder (IKB-057).

In a bond cycle the bonding head on an automated heavy wire wedge bonder makes a series of moves to achieve the desired bond and loop profiles. Some options for the programmed bond will add or remove movements but the general bond head movements are similar. This knowledge base document gives an overview of the bond head motions to create a two-bond wire.

Front or Rear Cut?

For heavy wire wedge bonding applications there are two configurations of bond head: front cut and rear cut. Front cut bond heads sees the cutter blade sit forward of the bond tool and wire guide/clamp assembly and rear cut sees the cutter blade sit behind the bond tool, in-between the bond tool and wire guide/clamp assembly.

Each bond head, whether it is front or rear cut, could include a wire clamp that assists with looping and wire break movements by clamping the wire, preventing unwanted wire slip or feeding. In the latest generations of bond head, wire clamps are now included as standard on all machines for this purpose.

Selection of front or rear cut bond head is driven by the assemblies being bonded. Front cut bond head’s are preferred as the wire termination and wire break moves are simpler and easier to perform in comparison to rear cut.

On a two-bond wire, the bonding sequence will go from the active part to the packaging or substrate; on front cut bond head’s there is the potential for the cutter blade to mark or contact the surface as the cutter blade cuts through 95 – 100% of the wire diameter during the termination bond.

If process dictates the bonding sequence must be reversed and the termination bond is located on the active device, then front cut is not ideal as there is the risk of the cutter blade causing damage to active components. In this instance a rear cut bond head would be preferred, as the wire break moves only need to weaken the termination bond wire, cutting through 75 – 80% of the wire diameter, thus enabling the termination bond to be placed on an active device.

Another driving factor for selection of a rear cut bond head over a front cut bond head would be clearance issues. Comparing the front/rear cut bond head images above, you can see the clearance to the front of the bond tool on the rear cut is better compared to the front cut.

If you need to bond close up to a ledge (inside a package) or other component (on a board / substrate), then the rear cut bond head has obvious benefits.

Natural or Forced Bond Angles?

Heavy Wire Wedge Bonding - Natural or Forced Angles
Heavy Wire Wedge Bonding – Natural or Forced Angles?

In a two-bond wire the locations of the bonds determine the direction of the wire or loop. If the bond angle is in line with the angle of the loop, then this is referred to as a natural angle, which is usually the case as this requires minimal bond-head movement and will not impact throughput; however it is possible to select a distinct angle to place the first bond and second (termination) bonds; this is called “forcing” the bond angle. Bond angles are usually forced to allow for narrower bond pitch or smaller bonding sites.

Note: Natural or forced angle diagram above shows a two dimensional bond head movement; actual movement occurs in three dimensions with rotation.

The “Heavy Wire Wedge Bonding – Bond Head Movements” diagram shows the entire movements of the bond head for a two-bond wire. These steps are explained below in more detail:

  1. Interwire Height to Search Height: The bond head moves rapidly to a point directly over the first bond and bond pad at the pre-set bond rotation. ALC wire clamp closes.
  2. Search Height to First Bond Pad: The bond head moves straight down at a slower, constant rate. The Bond tool and wire touch the first bond pad.
  3. First Bond: The first bond is made. For natural angle bond with a start force > 300 grams, the ALC wire clamp is open; otherwise it is closed.
  4. First Bond Pad to Twist Height: The bond head ascends rapidly straight up. ALC wire clamp stays open.
  5. Twist Height to Loop Top: Motion shifts to the step forward angle. If the last bond had a forced angle, the bond head turns to the natural angle for the next bond and ascends rapidly to loop top to form the loop. (Loop top is calculated by the distance between the bonds and the programmable loop factor). ALC wire clamps closes.
  6. Loop Top to Search Height: The bond head arcs down rapidly to finish the loop. The bond head is directly over the bond pad at search height. Rotation is at the natural wire angle.
  7. Search Height to Last Bond Pad: The bond head descends at a slower, constant rate. The bond tool touches the bond pad. Note: For forced angle bonds the ALC wire clamp is closed and the bond head goes to Move 8. For natural angle stitch bonds, the bond tool descends and completes the bond. For the last bond, the bond head goes to Move 10.
  8. Last Bond to Touch Twist Height: (Forced angles only) The bond head ascends rapidly to the touch twist height rotating to the last bond angle.
  9. Touch Twist to Last Bond: (Forced angle only) The bond head descends straight down at a slower constant rate to the last bond. See note in Moves 1 & 3 about ALC wire clamp being open or closed.
  10. Last Bond Pad to Tail Length:
    1. Rear Cut: The cutter blade cuts the wire at the surface. The bond head ascends rapidly to the tail length height. Bond head rotation stays at the last bond angle. ALC wire clamp is open.
    2. Front Cut: The bond head ascends rapidly to the tail length height. Bond head rotation stays at the last bond angle. ALC wire clamp is open.
  11. Tail Length Height to Surface (hop move): The bond head moves rapidly to a point on the surface directly behind the last bond. ALC wire clamp is open
  12. Surface to Break Height:
    1. Rear Cut: Got to move 13.
    2. Front Cut: The cutter blade cuts the wire at the surface. The bond head ascends rapidly to the break height. ALC wire clamp closes.
  13. Break Height to Break Move: The bond head moves rapidly along the break distance at the break angle. ALC clamp closes.
  14. End of Break Move to Interwire Height: The bond head ascends rapidly to the interwire height. ALC wire clamp closes.
  15. Move to the First Bond of the next Wire or the Park Position: The bond head moves rapidly at interwire height to a point directly over the first bond position of the next wire (ready for Move 1). Or the Park position if the assembly is complete. ALC clamp closes.
Heavy Wire Wedge Bonder - Front Cut Configuration
Heavy Wire Wedge Bonder – Front Cut Configuration

Heavy Wire Wedge Bonder - Rear Cut Configuration
Heavy Wire Wedge Bonder – Rear Cut Configuration

Heavy Wire Wedge Bonding - Bond Head Movements
Heavy Wire Wedge Bonding – Bond Head Movements

For further information on our range of large heavy wire wedge bonding equipment, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Adam Marshall

Date

21 April 2020

Version

IKB057 Rev. 1

Download

Wire Bonding Battery Connections

23rd May 2020

Wire and ribbon bonding of Lithium-Ion battery connections delivers considerable benefits in power pack volume production. This document reviews materials, production considerations and bonding machine capabilities (IKB-069).

Wire Bonding Battery Connections:
A modern Lithium-Ion battery pack comprises several cells, wired in series and parallel combinations to achieve the pack’s desired power performance, noting that ‘wiring’ includes the use of wires (aluminium is most common) and bus-bars (typically formed from sheet aluminium, nickel or copper).

Where wiring in the traditional sense is concerned, the physical connections are made in one of three ways; spot welding, laser welding or wire (or ribbon) bonding. Of these, the last is particularly popular because the bond is achieved through ultrasonic compression, so minimal heat is applied to the cell, and differences in height (such as between cell end caps and a busbar – see figure 1) are easily accommodated thanks to the flexibility of the wire or ribbon.

Once in place, wire bonded connections can also act as fuses, and failing cells will simply self-isolate as opposed to remaining in-circuit and contributing to a potential pack meltdown. Also, limited rework is possible once wires or ribbons are in place.

The flexibility of wires and ribbons also helps accommodate height differences between cell end caps and bus-bars.

Materials & Handling:
Bond wires are traditionally aluminium (>99% pure), with diameters used in battery production typically ranging from 200 to 300µm. Ribbon, which tends to be used for low impedance / high current applications, or to provide a more rigid interconnect, has a roughly rectangular cross-section, ranging from 500 x 100µm to 2000 x 250 µm. Per length, ribbon is more expensive than wire but because a single ribbon can achieve the same as multiple bond wires (see figure 2), significant benefits come through reduced manufacturing times.

Where multiple wires are used in high current applications, alternatively, fewer ribbons can be used – the decision will mainly be governed by the trade-off between material costs and manufacturing times.

Supplied on spools, wires and ribbons have shelf-lives, as the build-up of oxides, which compromise bond quality, cannot be fully eliminated. Storage should be upright in a humidity-controlled cabinet (ideally with a nitrogen atmosphere) and away from heat.

Care must also be taken when handling the wire or ribbon as organic contamination from the oils in human skin can compromise bond quality. Accordingly, it is necessary to use gloves and finger cots for threading tasks, and tools such as tweezers that come into contact with the wire/ribbon should be kept clean, using alcohol for example.

Understandably, the electrodes of the cell need to be clean too. Cleanliness aside, it is worth noting that not all surface metals are bondable. In a Lithium Ion cell, the anode tends to be a carbon-based material. Anodes are commonly a lithium metal oxide. Anodes and cathodes are capped with end plates – made from nickel-plated stainless steel, for example – to make them bondable.

Bonding & Testing:
Within the electronics industry, wire bonding is also performed within IC packaging and on PCBs, and either wedge or ball bonding techniques can be used. Where battery packs are concerned the wires tend to be larger than for ICs and PCBs, and wedge bonders are employed, noting that they are so called because the edge of the wire or ribbon is compressed into a wedge shape during the bonding process.

Three parameters govern the bond strength achievable: time, force and ultrasonic power. If any single parameter is insufficient the desired bond strength will not be achieved, or you may even get a complete ‘non-stick’. An excess of one, more or all the parameters compromises quality too, as the bond might take but the wedge will be damaged and weakened.

Automated large area wedge bonders (like the one shown in figure 3) are proving increasingly popular in battery production, where the ‘large area’ reduces line-integration costs and production steps such as indexing and loading.

Rather than employing belt or leadscrew drives, automated wedge bonders for battery pack production are increasingly ‘direct drive’ and the motion system has XYZ axes and T (Theta, rotational) parameters. Such systems are responsive, with fast acceleration / deceleration and have minimal backlash. Reliability is high and maintenance is simplified, thus reducing the cost-of-ownership. Automation can also include real-time physical testing using a non-destructive pull tester.

In summary, automated wedge bonders, as used for wire and ribbon bonding during battery pack production, are highly capable machines. On the premise that the cells used will be low-cost items there could be slight differences in their physical sizes, but this is easily accounted for with flexible wire/ribbon. Also, it is imperative not to damage the cells, which the heat of a weld could easily do, so ultrasonic wedge bonding is the safest method.

NOTE: This article was first published in “Future Vehicle, April 2020 Edition

Ribbon & Wire Bonded Lithium-Ion Battery Connections
Figure 1: Ribbon & Wire Bonded Lithium-Ion Battery Connections

Example Application with Multiple Wire Bonded
Figure 2: Example Application with Multiple Wire Bonded Connections

K&S Asterion EV Battery Wire Bonder for Wire Bonding Battery Connections
Figure 3: Wire Bonding Battery Connections – K&S Asterion EV Battery Bonder

For further information on our range of wire bonding equipment for battery research or production, please click HERE.

For further information on our range of wire bonding materials for battery research or production, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Matt Brown

Date

23 May 2020

Version

IKB069 Rev. 1

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Solder Die Attach For High Power Devices

21st May 2020

Solder Die Attach: Explanation of the process and use of solder die attach in high power applications (IKB-016).

Power Semiconductor devices are common in electronic equipment running greater than 10 Watts. These devices are found in inverters, converters, diodes, MOSFET and IGBT modules, and are utilised in locomotive, automotive, renewable energy and HVDC applications. The high frequency switching and current capability of these devices means that solder is the most common form of metal-to-metal joining, as it provides the most reliable and efficient means of conducting both thermally and electrically.

Solder die attach is the process of affixing a silicon die or chip to a lead frame, substrate or similar packaging, with either adhesive, conductive adhesive or solder. A die attach bond is usually between the back of a silicon die and the metallic surface of a leadframe or substrate.

Power semiconductor packages are subjected to extensive thermal energy and thermal cycling during normal operation. To effectively dissipate this heat energy, metal solder is the chosen method of die attach. Solder die attach also provides strong mechanical strength and fatigue resistance, which is a crucial property to have, considering the mechanical and thermal stresses that a power module would typically see in its working life.

Solder is used typically in three forms for solder die attach: preforms, wire or paste.

  • Preforms: Are typically used in batch production. The solder is in a solid state, and is usually the same dimensions in X&Y as the die being attached. These can be supplied in bulk (glass vials) or in Waffle Packs. The bond line thickness of the solder joint is determined by the thickness of the preform solder. An inline oven or vacuum solder reflow oven is typically used for this process.
  • Wire: Is dispensed with an accurate wire feed system onto a preheated leadframe, with a combination of a ‘spanker’ or bond force. The melted solder wire is formed into the desired shape for the die or component being attached.
  • Paste: Small particles of solder are mixed with liquid flux to form a paste. This is either dispensed or screen printed onto a leadframe and processed in a similar way to preforms. Because of the liquid flux additive that helps wettability, an aqueous cleaning stage is needed post solder process to remove the flux residue.

Solder alloys used in die attach have a melting point (liquidus) of around 275 – 345°C. Because of the higher junction temperatures of power semiconductor devices, higher melting point solders are need to reduce joint failure.

Example Power Module Devices using Solder Reflow Technology
Example Power Module Devices using Solder Reflow Technology

Example TO Style Leadframe Device Using Solder Die and Clip Attach Process
Example Power Module Devices using Solder Reflow Technology

Solder Preforms
Example Solder Preforms

For more information on our range of Solder Preforms, please click HERE.

For more information on our range of Solder Reflow Ovens, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Adam Marshall

Date

16 November 2017

Version

IKB016 Rev. 1

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How IR Induction Furnaces Work

21st May 2020

Explanation on how infrared induction furnaces work, using the ATV Solder Reflow Oven as an example (IKB-024).

Infrared induction furnaces for solder reflow typically come in the construct of a cold walled vacuum chamber, consisting of a bank of IR lamps and heating plate. The purpose of this system is to provide elevated temperatures for processes such as soldering, brazing, annealing and getter activation in the electronics industry.

Vacuum solder reflow ovens are an example of an infrared induction furnace. Reflowing solder during vacuum helps to remove voids from the bond line of a solder junction. This is achieved by pulling out gases or liquids, whilst the solder is above its reflow temperature and under vacuum of around 0.003mbar abs.

The vacuum chambers are water cooled to maintain a safe environment and to maintain the integrity of the vacuum seals.

Inside the chamber are multiple IR lamps that are used to directly heat the plate, which the parts being processed will sit on. This plate can be constructed from carbon-coated aluminium for temperatures up to 450°C, or graphite for temperatures up to 700°C. The main benefit of direct IR heating is the fast ramp up and stability of the heating applied, while also being a more efficient means of providing heat and cooling to a solder junction. Feedback is provided to the system by multiple thermocouple monitoring, and process variation can come in the form of controlled gases to form different environments inside the chamber.

Below is an example of a process for formic acid solder reflow, which is a fluxless (clean) solder reflow process that uses heated formic acid vapour to remove contaminants from solder surfaces, thereby improving the hydrophilic properties.

IR Induction Furnace - ATV Vacuum Solder Reflow Oven
IR Induction Furnace – ATV Vacuum Solder Reflow Oven
These images show the IR lamps (left), heating plate fitted (middle) and the parts being processed (right)

  • The process starts with pulling a vacuum multiple times, before backfilling with nitrogen in an attempt to create an inert oxygen free atmosphere.
  • The hotplate is then directly heated by the IR lamps to follow the heating profile specified.
  • Formic acid (HCOOH) vapour is introduced at an elevated temperature of 150°C prior to the molten temperature of the solder, and this is the cleaning phase of the process.
  • The temperature profile reaches the maximum temperature specified in the profile (240°C) and dwells, allowing the solder to enter its liquid state.
  • A vacuum is used again to help pull any voids from the solder junction.
  • The final stage is to cool the chamber, heating plate and part back to a cooler temperature which is safe to handle. Cooling is achieved by directing pressurised nitrogen onto the underside of the heating plate and inside of the chamber. The ramp-down cooling rate can be controlled by the flow of pressurised N2 entering the chamber.
Typical Solder Reflow Profile Using Formic Acid

For more information on our range of ATV Vacuum Solder Reflow Equipment, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Adam Marshall

Date

05 May 2020

Version

IKB024 Rev. 1

Download

MPP Ribbon Tool: Slot Size to Ribbon Size

19th May 2020

Fine Ribbon Bonding Wedge: A guide to help specify the correct feed slot size for a given ribbon size on MPP wedge bonding tools (IKB-066).

MPP Fine Ribbon Bonding Wedge: Please use this information as a guide to help determine and select the correct slot size for the fine ribbon wedge you require. You will need to know the size of the ribbon you are using and required bond foot length (BL).

Fine Ribbon Wedge Tool: Foot Dimensions and Nomenclature
Fine Ribbon Wedge Tool: Foot Dimensions and Nomenclature

Step 1:

Find which code relates to your ribbon width and thickness.

For example, 0.002” width and 0.0005” thickness gives you A1.

This gives you your slot size in your wedge.

Fine Ribbon Wedge Tool: Types and Slot Size vs Ribbon Size Tables
Fine Ribbon Wedge Tool: Types and Slot Size versus Ribbon Size Tables

Step 2:

Once you have the code, cross reference it to the wedge model table.

You will need to have an idea of what bond length is necessary for the application.

Using the example from above – A1 – you can see there are two choices to select.

A120 – 0.002” x 0.0005” Slot Size – 0.020” BL

A125 – 0.002” x 0.0005” Slot Size – 0.025” BL

Step 3:

Once you have your four digit code for the ribbon (A120 for example), the specification of the wedge tool then has to be defined.

This includes features such as the Wire Feed Angle, Shank Style, Surface Finish, Wedge Length, etc.

These can all be found in the chart above and within wedge catalogues.

Below are some dimension drawings which explain in more detail what the key features of a wedge are.

Fine Ribbon Wedge Tool: Types and Slot Size versus Ribbon Size Tables

For further information on our range of Bonding Wedge Tools, please click HERE.

For further information on our range of Wire Bonding Materials, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Adam Marshall

Date

15 May 2020

Version

IKB066 Rev. 1

Download

MPP Wedge Tool: Feed Hole to Wire Diameter

19th May 2020

Fine Wire Bonding Wedge: A guide to help specify the correct feed hole size for a given wire diameter on a fine wire wedge bonding tool (IKB-065).

The wire diameter is defined by the application, taking into account the geometries of the bond pad, materials and circuit requirements. Thicker wires are preferred as they tend to create a stable loop and are easier to bond. However, there is a balance in the feed hole diameter against the wire diameter in order to maintain free uninhibited moment and feed of the wire when selecting the correct fine wire bonding wedge.

Larger hole sizes will influence the location and accuracy of the first bond. The smaller the hole, the tighter the control on the bond’s location. Care should be taken if the hole is made too small as the added friction will affect the looping height and tail consistency. Oval holes may be an option, providing tighter control to the first bond’s location, keeping the tail of the wire under the tool, but providing some relief to eliminate friction between the wire and hole.

Fine Wire Bonding Wedge Tool: Foot Dimensions
Fine Wire Tool: Foot Dimensions

Fine Wire Bonding Wedge Tool: Hole Size to Wire Diameter Table
Fine Wire Bonding Wedge Tool: Hole Size to Wire Diameter Table

For further information on our range of Bonding Wedge Tools, please click HERE.

For further information on our range of Wire Bonding Materials, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Adam Marshall

Date

15 May 2020

Version

IKB065 Rev. 1

Download

KnS Understanding Pattern Recognition

19th May 2020

What is pattern recognition and how is it used in automation on Kulicke and Soffa (KnS) automatic bonders for ball and bump bonding (IKB-033).

Pattern recognition is the process of identifying trends in a given pattern. A pattern is something that has some kind of regularity or follows a trend. The recognition of these patterns is determined by computer algorithms and is used in various applications, such as computer vision, speech recognition and facial recognition.

Systems in microelectronic production, assembly or test that use automation will utilise some sort of camera vision system and pattern recognition (PR) technology, in order to help determine locations of the part being manufactured or assembled.

An example of a system that has an integrated PR system is an automated wire bonder. For best results, the wire bonder must be able to accurately place all bonds. Variations in manufacturing steps prior to wire bonding cannot ensure repeatable part placement from device to device. Therefore to overcome this variable, PR uses trends (also referred to as models or fiducial’s) common to all devices to compensate for placement variations. Using the same fiducial, PR accurately aligns each device, even if the fiducial is not in exactly the same place each time. This is because the original coordinate is recorded, along with a snapshot of the fiducial. This is known as a PR model.

Systems such as an automated wire bonder will have different PR modes that can be used; this depends on which one gives the best result for your application. Each individual PR mode will use a different algorithm for trend recognition. Having a PR mode that is repeatable, accurate and fast are the determining criteria for the PR mode selection.

Automatic Wire Bonder
Automatic Wire Bonder

Pattern recognition algorithms compare a taught model against the current image seen by the machines vision system. The most basic form of PR algorithms will group and grid the field of view pixels of the live image from the vision system. The PR system will convert the live image into grey scale, and will be compare and score each grid against the model that is taught, particularly looking at the contrast in each grid. If the live model is found to be shifted in the X and/or Y dimensions, the wire bonder will acknowledge this and shift the process programme position.

For further information on our range of automatic ball and bump bonding equipment, please click HERE.

Author

Date

Version

Author

Adam Marshall

Date

11 May 2020

Version

IKB033 Rev. 1

Download

Inseto Business Continuity – COVID-19 Update

12th May 2020

Revision 3 – 12 May 2020

Inseto has continued to develop and implement its business continuity plans, in accordance with the latest UK Government and NHS guidelines regarding COVID-19.

We would like to reassure our customers, partners and suppliers, that we are continuing with business operations as normal but have adjusted our processes and practices to best protect our employees and associates during these exceptional times.

Inseto’s can be contacted as usual during business hours, with telephone, video conferencing and remote support facilities all available.

Download a copy of our Inseto, Andover “Risk Assessment” HERE.

Please download a copy of this document HERE.

Kind regards,

Matt Brown

Managing Director

Local Charities Receive £7,000 Donation from Inseto

12th May 2020

Andover, United Kingdom – Inseto, one of the UK’s leading technical distributors of equipment and materials into advanced engineering sectors, has donated £7,000 to seven local charities, all of which are close to the hearts of the company’s employees.

Matt Brown - Managing Director of Inseto
Andover-based Inseto has donated £7,000 to seven local charities. Matt Brown (pictured), Director of Inseto: “…we feel it is important to support our local charities, just as they have supported our employees and members of their families during their difficult times.”

A donation of £1,000 has been made to each of the following registered charities: The Countess of Brecknock Hospice, a specialist palliative care unit attached to Andover War Memorial Hospital, Andover MIND; which has been working in the area since 1984 to support and advise anyone affected by mental health distress; the Andover Crisis Support Centre, which provides accommodation for women and women with children in need of a supportive environment; Andover Food Bank, which provides support for local people in distress; Naomi House, which opened in 1997 to offer care and support to children who were not expected to live until adulthood; the Abel Foundation,which was created to aid the suffers of Mitochondrial Disease and help their families deal with this life limiting disease, for which there is currently no cure; and Two Saints, which provides safe housing and support services to reduce homelessness, and improve health and well-being.

Matt Brown, Managing Director of Inseto, comments: “Most charities are suffering during the Coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic and whilst the UK Government has announced an emergency support package for ‘front-line’ charities, we’re worried that funds may not reach several of our local ones here in Andover, that are more reliant on community based fund raising.”

Established in 1987, Inseto distributes equipment and materials, such as silicon wafers and specialist adhesives, used in the manufacture of integrated circuits (ICs, electronic chips) that are then used in mobile phones, wearable electronics, satellites and electric and hybrid vehicles, to name but a few applications.

Brown concludes: “Like most companies we’re having to watch our outgoings during these difficult times, but we feel it is important to support our local charities, just as they have supported our employees’ families and friends during their difficult times.”

For further information please visit: www.inseto.co.uk